Partner Cities

Partner Cities

India’s present urban challenges make its cities more vulnerable to losses that might result from the impacts of climate change. The project will result in enhanced capacities of city officials in the four project cities to develop, institutionalize and update climate resilience and GHG reduction measures and plans.All four partner cities, through their vision statements, policies, plans and projects, have explicitly stated the intent to ensure sustainable, resource efficient and climate resilient urban development.

Coimbatore, a major textile, educational hub and medical centre is the second largest urban agglomeration in the state of Tamil Nadu, in South of India. Even though the local government has undertaken significant energy efficient measures across different sectors of buildings, sewage and transportation, implementable measures and technical support in building capacities for interventions in other sectors are of vital importance.

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    To addressing the problems related to heavy traffic in the city, a mobility plan was drafted but still has not been implemented and needs to be refined in terms of low carbon solutions. Management of solid waste is another key issue as the present waste processing, treatment and disposal infrastructureis not sufficient to cater to the needs of the city. The local government initiated many waste segregation and recycling workshops for its citizens to generate awareness. One ward in Coimbatore has achieved 100% segregation and a “zero waste” status with implementation of decentralized waste management systems. Water availability,affected by water leakages, a depleting groundwater table and the increasing demand for water, requiring immediate attention, is identified as another concern.

Rajkot, a major industrial and commercial/trading centre has recently witnessed large-scale new town infrastructure and construction to meet its growing population demands. The city faces similar challenges, like Coimbatore, in the areas of solid waste management, mobility and water; though effective measures for buildings and the transport sector are underway.

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    Sewage treatment is a major challenge that the city facesas absence of waste water treatment infrastructure leads to untreated sewage beingdischarged into surface water streams. The city has declared, in 2015, its intent to become carbon neutral by the year 2020. Also, resilience is considered an important part of Rajkot’s vision. ICLEI South Asia is active in the partner cities of Coimbatore and Rajkot through the Urban-LEDS project (2012-2016) and has completed the development of a GHG emissions inventory for 2013. A first hand assessment of needs in both cities has been completed from the perspective of enhancing service delivery and limiting GHG emissions, which provides a good working base for the CapaCITIESproject.

The city of Udaipur, popular for its history and culture, is built around inter-connected lake systems. Marble industry and tourism drive the economy of the city. Solid waste management, a problem sector, has been highlighted in the city’s recent Smart City Proposal submitted to the government of India, under the flagship programme– Smart Cities Mission.

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    Udaipur is one among the first 20 selected cities to be funded under this Mission. Currently, ICLEI South Asia is also involved in supporting transportation related interventions in Udaipur, specifically linked to the city’s proposal. Rejuvenation of the Ahar River, and building energy efficiency were other key issues that emerged in discussions with the city. ICLEI South Asia also prepared a GHG emissions inventory for Udaipur in 2008 and priority sectors were identified from a mitigation perspective.

Siliguri, a city in the foothills of the Himalayas in the Northeastern part of the country acts as a transit point for inter-city/state boundaries connecting the neighbouring countries of Bhutan and Nepal. As a city highly prone to natural disasters such as flooding and earthquakes, it has recently witnessed large-scale construction with improper planning and management.

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    Due to the sharp increase of vehicular traffic growth in one year (129%), the city faces heavy traffic congestion; presence of all forms of motorized transport (particularly autorickshaws) on the narrow roads of its city adds to mobility issues, especially for pedestrians. Hence mobility emerges as one of the critical sectors to be addressed by the CapaCITIES project. Another key challenge is the absence of scientific solid waste management infrastructure. About 300-350 metric tonnes/day of waste is produced by the city with no access to solid waste treatment/processing. Doorstep segregation of waste was initiated by the local authorities but could not be sustained. Thus, with unrestricted development of the city, many challenges need to be addressed to make the green city vision of the Municipal Corporation of Siliguri, a reality.